Sunday, March 08, 2009

How can you tell a Frenchman's been in your backyard? Your trashcans are empty and your dog's pregnant.

Speaking of movies that continue to be classics that I can quote line by line, we've now moved on to Stand By Me. It never gets old and it never fails to make me laugh.



I wish I had more pull in the world, I would totally bring "boss" back. Ok, maybe not.

We were just discussing the rating (it's R...presumably mostly for language...the leech scene might not have helped) and how unusual it is that it basically stars a bunch of kids (aging from about 12 to 15), yet it's a fairly hard R. I actually really wish more movies were like that these days, but it's rarely the case. So many movies are dumbed down, lame, tame and generally witless. It's hard to think of a comparable film with realistic dialogue for kids this age, but I could be overlooking something I suppose? Mmm, oh yes, She's All That, absolutely.



Some of my favorite trivia bits from imdb...

While practicing his lines, Jerry O'Connell was incredibly impressed that, as an 11-year old, he was being allowed to swear.

When they were filming the scene where Gordie and Vern are about to be run over by the train, Wil Wheaton and Jerry O' Connell did not look scared enough; in frustration Rob Reiner yelled at them to the point where they started crying and that's when they were able to film the scene.

The pond the boys fall into was a man made pool because the crew wanted them to be "safe and secure" and didn't want to put them a real pond because they didn't know what was in it. But Corey Feldman stated in a interview the joke of the whole thing was they built and filled it with water in June and by time they got to film the scene it was in August. So it been out in the woods for 3 months and they didn't know what was in it anyway.


Great ending, can't wait to see Wesley Crusher take on Jack Bauer, kwim? ;)

4 comments:

alex said...

It's hard to think of a comparable film with realistic dialogue for kids this age, but I could be overlooking something I suppose?

O_O Man. Can't think of a thing. (hahaha, the 80's were all about pre-teens and risk-taking behavior. XD Remember Cloak & Dagger where the kid KILLS one of the bad guys? Adventures in Babysitting, with the knife fight and the shooting. The Goonies was all about kids trying not to get killed... Haha, Toy Soliders... And it was all so earnest and in Good Fun! [--I mean to say, it never went all Kids-serious.] But I seem to have veered off-track here.)

It's been awhile since I've seen a teen/pre-teen movie I liked, let alone admired the dialogue. The closest thing I can think of is Juno, and I didn't like it so much as just respect it. Before that... ... uh... Almost Famous, 2000?

PS omg wee!Kiefer is so wee!

Ellen Aim said...

Yeah! That's what I LOVE! Cloak and Dagger is a great example cause a kid shooting one of the bad guys would NEVER happen these days. A REAL GUN, OMFG!!

Toy Soldiers...damn, that's one I so need to own! Hee hee.

Juno is pretty close to realistic dialogue (however painful) and even a serious situation, but somehow comes off light. (Which serves it well, really.)

It's surprising to me how SBM deals with nothing but depressing scenarios (Denny's death, finding The Body, everyone disappearing from each other's life and Chris eventually getting stabbed) and yet I do not find it a depressing movie at all. How is this possible?

Ellen Aim said...

Oh, and I KNOW!! Kiefer looks so young and very Lost Boys-era yummy. I get distracted, personally. ;)

alex said...

--and yet I do not find it a depressing movie at all. How is this possible?

Haha, I don't know, because I always did! XD Though I do get what you're saying. I think it's because SBM never gets maudlin; it's just very matter-of-fact, and the story is told with a wistful/nostalgic tone. So well done!